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You could save over £200* when you compare 100+ leading car insurance providers and earn up to £25 cashback

Offering quotes from these trusted providers and many more

Admiral
Diamond
Endsleigh
Kwikfit
Swinton
RAC

What you'll need

    To ensure the quote process runs as smoothly as possible, please have the following to hand:

  • Your driving licence
  • Your car's registration number, or failing that, your car's make, model and engine size will suffice.
  • Your car's current mileage and expected annual mileage.
  • Details of where you park your car and what its used for (e.g. whether you use it for business or commuting, or just for personal use).

Switching your insurance with Quidco Compare couldn't be more simple.

Just enter the relevant details and we'll present you with a range of great deals from a great range of insurance providers.

Need to know

  • No, it’s a legal requirement to have at least third party car insurance cover to drive in the UK.

  • There are a few easy steps you can follow. Fitting an alarm or immobiliser and parking your car in a garage (if possible) will help secure a better deal. Likewise limiting the number of people who drive your vehicle and curbing its annual mileage will also help. Finally, opting to pay a higher excess (the amount you pay towards any claim) is also looked upon favourably by insurers.

  • It can cover damage to your and another driver’s car after an accident. It can also cover theft, vandalism and fire.

  • UK car insurance comes in three main categories:

    • Third party: This is the minimum legal requirement for car insurance. It's a basic form of insurance that covers the costs of any damage incurred while driving. For example, if a driver is in an accident with another car, the at-fault driver is liable for damage to the other person's car, and for any medical expenses they incur as a result of the accident. Note, however, that the insurance does not cover the costs of damage to the car belonging to the driver who is deemed at fault.
    • Third party, fire, and theft: This is similar to third party insurance, but also covers the cost of replacing a car if it's stolen or damaged in a fire.
    • Comprehensive cover: Provides everything as above, but also covers costs for repairing the car belonging to an at-fault driver.

    Depending on the insurer and the policy, the driver may be covered when driving other cars, including hired cars. Some policies also allow the policyholder to name other drivers to be covered when driving their car.

  • Paying annually in one go will usually work out cheaper because you will be charged interest of up to 30% when you pay monthly.

  • An excess is the amount you must pay in the event of any claim, regardless of who is to blame for an incident. It varies depending on the car that is covered, the age and experience of the drivers on your policy.

  • For every year of claim free driving, each policyholder will earn a discount towards the cost of their renewal (to a maximum of 9 years).

  • No, your existing provider will likely be more expensive so its best to shop around to find a new deal rather than renewing.

  • Most car insurance policies last one year, but you can cancel your cover for a fee. You can get short term cover for between one day and three months.

  • Some ways to reduce premium costs might include:

    • Drivers that avoid making claims may benefit from a premium discount; the discount typically gets higher with consecutive claim-free years.
    • The no-claims discount may often be transferred to a new insurance provider if a driver finds a better deal elsewhere.
    • The no-claims discount doesn't necessarily prevent an insurer from increasing premium costs. It's a discount applied to whatever the premium is, so the premium could increase even if the discount remains the same.
    • Most policies have two separate excess amounts. One is set by the insurer and is an integral part of the policy. The second is one that the driver may set themselves. To reduce their premium a driver could opt to set this excess higher, but it does mean they tend to pay more out of pocket if they have to make a claim. And since the excess has a mandatory per-policy component, there could be an excess to pay on every claim regardless of how high the voluntary excess is set.
    • Car modifications of any kind could result in a premium increase, so it may be good idea for a driver to check with their insurer before adding any mods.
    • Paying premiums annually rather than monthly could reduce the cost significantly.

Useful information

Please note: by clicking the "Get a quote" button, you consent to your details being used by the comparison partner and insurance quote providers. Don't worry they won't call or email though. Full details are in our privacy policy. Quidco is a trading style of Maple Syrup Media Ltd which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and you can see the details of our service in relation to insurance here

When using the Quidco Compare service, you must take reasonable care to answer insurers questions fully and accurately and if you volunteer other information, you must take reasonable care to ensure that the information is not misleading. If any information that you have provided changes before you take out your insurance, during the life of the policy or at renewal you must inform the insurer or broker of the change. If you deliberately or carelessly misrepresent any information in relation to this insurance, then your policy may not pay all, or part, of a claim and could in certain circumstances be avoided altogether.

Disclaimer: Cashback amounts were earned by Quidco users from Jan – Mar 2016 and are based on an average of the top 10% of users who earned cashback for that product.

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