Energy

Compare and make savings on your gas, electric and dual fuel quotes. Plus, get up to £40 cashback.

Energy category illustration
Energy category illustration

Compare the UK’s leading energy providers

Find a better energy deal for less.

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Get quotes

Enter some details (takes just a moment). We’ll quickly find great deals for you.

2
Compare

Receive prices from trusted energy providers, including SSE, British Gas and Npower.

3
Get paid

Once you’ve switched energy suppliers, relax. Your cashback will be on its way to you.

Why use Compare to get an energy quote?

Why us? Well, by changing your energy supplier through Compare, you can save as much as you would on the other comparison sites. The difference? We’ll give you cashback on top.

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How do I get a cheaper energy deal?

Don’t be loyal — switch energy suppliers and get cashback

There’s a price cap that energy regulator Ofgem introduced to stop people overpaying for energy, and suppliers charging too much. This cap changes every year, and although providers change their costs to suit the new cap, people still miss out on extra money they could save by not switching.

Switching suppliers and not letting your current agreement auto-renew can help save you up to hundreds a year. The fun doesn’t stop there. If you make the switch through Compare, you can get up to £40 cashback on top.

Check if you’re owed money back

If you do choose to switch energy provider (and we highly recommend that you do), be sure to check whether you’re in credit with your old supplier once you’ve decided to change. Or in other words, you’ve paid too much for the amount of energy you’ve received.

If this is the case, then your provider owes you the funds that you haven’t used. They should automatically pay you back, but many suppliers don’t. This is especially true if you switched suppliers before 2014, when new government regulations came in to encourage suppliers to pay back any credit owed.

Checking your credit and making a refund claim is easy. Check out My Energy Credit, a website that helps people claim back money they’ve left with an old supplier.

Take advantage of free boiler and insulation grants

Some of the main reasons why people overpay for their energy tariffs are old inefficient boilers and a lack of insulation. 

Good news: the government has recently encouraged energy suppliers to introduce free boiler and insulation grants. This means you can get a loan to replace your boiler or redo your insulation. The best part? You don’t have to pay it back. So you could end up with a completely free, shiny new boiler or better insulation.

This will help cut the cost of your energy bills in the long run. As better boilers and insulation mean less wasted energy, which means less wasted money.

What types of energy tariffs are there?

The different type of tariff you have will determine which way you’ll be charged for your energy. There are a few different types out there and, while some of them have fancy names, they’re pretty simple to understand.

Standard variable tariff

Standard variable tariff

This is what most people have. With this type of energy tariff, you pay by the unit. As the wholesale price of energy goes up and down, so does what you pay. 

In some months you pay less. Some months you pay more. It can be more difficult to budget your life with this type of tariff, however.

Fixed price tariff

Fixed price tariff

This is where you pay a fixed amount in a contract. The price you pay each month will change with the amount of energy you use, but it won’t change with the price of wholesale energy.

This means that it’s good when the price of wholesale energy is high, but when the price is low you could be paying more than it's worth.

Dual fuel tariff

Dual fuel tariff

Dual fuel tariff is where you get all your energy (both gas and electric) from one provider. Depending on which energy supplier you get this tariff with, it can be cheaper than getting your energy from separate providers, as they may give you a discount for getting both through them.

Check before to make sure that going down the dual-fuel route is actually cheaper than getting good gas and electric rates from different suppliers, as that’s sometimes the case. Read more about dual fuel here. 

Capped tariff

Capped tariff

With this type of tariff, you have a cap of how much you pay per unit (KwH). The amount you pay won’t go over the capped amount.

This doesn’t mean that your energy bill at the end of the month is capped, just the price you pay per unit of energy (KwH). So if you use more units one month, you could still end up paying more. Makes sense?

This is a good option for you if you’d like to create a monthly budget, as your costs will stay relatively stable. But getting a capped tariff is rarely the cheapest option.

Green energy tariff

Green energy tariff

Green energy has taken off in the last few years, as more people aim to reduce their energy consumption to help save the planet. There are a few different ways green (or eco) tariffs work. One way is that your supplier provides you with renewable energy. Another is where your supplier will ‘give back’ the energy you use to the National Grid to be renewed.

Green energy can often be a cheap option. And you get the added feel-good factor of helping the planet.

Economy 7 and Economy 10 tariff

Economy 7 and Economy 10 tariff

With these tariffs, you can save money by only using energy at off-peak times. Economy 7 has off-peak late at night and in the morning, such as around 12am and 7am. Economy 10, on the other hand, has off-peak hours at different times throughout the day.

Economy 7 can be good for you if you’re not around during the day much, and usually use most of your energy in the evenings and mornings.

Economy 7 and Economy 10 are usually cheaper for people who stick to the off-peak hours. But using energy outside of these hours, or during peak hours, can be more expensive. To help you, your supplier should equip you with a special meter to measure how much energy you’re using at what hours.

  • Standard variable tariff

    Standard variable tariff

    This is what most people have. With this type of energy tariff, you pay by the unit. As the wholesale price of energy goes up and down, so does what you pay. 

    In some months you pay less. Some months you pay more. It can be more difficult to budget your life with this type of tariff, however.

  • Fixed price tariff

    Fixed price tariff

    This is where you pay a fixed amount in a contract. The price you pay each month will change with the amount of energy you use, but it won’t change with the price of wholesale energy.

    This means that it’s good when the price of wholesale energy is high, but when the price is low you could be paying more than it's worth.

  • Dual fuel tariff

    Dual fuel tariff

    Dual fuel tariff is where you get all your energy (both gas and electric) from one provider. Depending on which energy supplier you get this tariff with, it can be cheaper than getting your energy from separate providers, as they may give you a discount for getting both through them.

    Check before to make sure that going down the dual-fuel route is actually cheaper than getting good gas and electric rates from different suppliers, as that’s sometimes the case. Read more about dual fuel here. 

  • Capped tariff

    Capped tariff

    With this type of tariff, you have a cap of how much you pay per unit (KwH). The amount you pay won’t go over the capped amount.

    This doesn’t mean that your energy bill at the end of the month is capped, just the price you pay per unit of energy (KwH). So if you use more units one month, you could still end up paying more. Makes sense?

    This is a good option for you if you’d like to create a monthly budget, as your costs will stay relatively stable. But getting a capped tariff is rarely the cheapest option.

  • Green energy tariff

    Green energy tariff

    Green energy has taken off in the last few years, as more people aim to reduce their energy consumption to help save the planet. There are a few different ways green (or eco) tariffs work. One way is that your supplier provides you with renewable energy. Another is where your supplier will ‘give back’ the energy you use to the National Grid to be renewed.

    Green energy can often be a cheap option. And you get the added feel-good factor of helping the planet.

  • Economy 7 and Economy 10 tariff

    Economy 7 and Economy 10 tariff

    With these tariffs, you can save money by only using energy at off-peak times. Economy 7 has off-peak late at night and in the morning, such as around 12am and 7am. Economy 10, on the other hand, has off-peak hours at different times throughout the day.

    Economy 7 can be good for you if you’re not around during the day much, and usually use most of your energy in the evenings and mornings.

    Economy 7 and Economy 10 are usually cheaper for people who stick to the off-peak hours. But using energy outside of these hours, or during peak hours, can be more expensive. To help you, your supplier should equip you with a special meter to measure how much energy you’re using at what hours.

    FAQs

    How do I pay my energy bill?

    There are a few ways of paying your energy bill.


    Monthly direct debit

    The most common, and probably the easiest way to pay your energy bill. With this, you’ll be charged for your energy on the same day every month. The cost of the bill might change slightly month to month, depending on how much energy you’re using and the wholesale price of energy at the time.

    Some months you may overpay for your energy, while others you’ll underpay. If you overpay you’ll be in credit, which means you can claim back the money you’re owed. If you underpay, you’ll be in debt, and your supplier could increase other months’ bills to pay for it.


    Quarterly direct debit

    Basically the same as monthly, but instead of every month, you’ll pay every three months. Naturally, the bill every three months will be higher than a bill every month. So you need to make sure you can afford a larger sum of money being taken out of your account fewer times a year.


    Use a payment card

    The way this works is that you get a quarterly bill and a payment card. You can use your payment card to pay your quarterly bill over its three-month period. The idea is that it gives you more control over how and when you pay your bill, and it doesn’t get taken out of your account in one fell swoop.

    This way of payment is best if you want to spread out your costs throughout the quarter. But if you fail to pay for all of your energy in one quarter, you have to pay more the next.

    What is the average UK energy bill?

    The average energy bill for gas and electricity in the UK is £104.50 a month, or £1,254 a year, according to Ofgem data from April 2019.

    Of course, someone’s energy bill is determined by a whole range of factors, such as the size of their home and the number of people living there. It also chops and changes month to month, due to the fluctuating wholesale price of energy.

    How long is it before my cashback is confirmed?

    Your cashback will be tracked within 72 hours of you taking out a gas, electric or dual fuel tariff. It will then be confirmed with your energy provider and available for withdrawal within four months. You can always check the progress of your cashback in your Activity.

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